odditiesoflife:

Food Rorschach Tests
Quick, what comes to mind when you see these Rorschach tests made with food? Madrid-based photographer Esther Lobo created a series of fantastic Rorschach inkblot tests made with yogurt, ice cream, peanut butter, condiments, and other types of food:

"The stains were made completely manually with my own hands and without post-processing tricks. I used soft plastic plates (Foamy). Then I dropped foods such as mustard, squid ink or soya over the plates. After bending the plates I obtained the symmetric stains. Finally I have placed the source of the stain over the symmetrical image, and so documented the psychological portrait of each food stuff."

What first comes to mind when you look at each image is supposed to say something about your personality. But in this case, it might just be hunger.
source
odditiesoflife:

Food Rorschach Tests
Quick, what comes to mind when you see these Rorschach tests made with food? Madrid-based photographer Esther Lobo created a series of fantastic Rorschach inkblot tests made with yogurt, ice cream, peanut butter, condiments, and other types of food:

"The stains were made completely manually with my own hands and without post-processing tricks. I used soft plastic plates (Foamy). Then I dropped foods such as mustard, squid ink or soya over the plates. After bending the plates I obtained the symmetric stains. Finally I have placed the source of the stain over the symmetrical image, and so documented the psychological portrait of each food stuff."

What first comes to mind when you look at each image is supposed to say something about your personality. But in this case, it might just be hunger.
source
odditiesoflife:

Food Rorschach Tests
Quick, what comes to mind when you see these Rorschach tests made with food? Madrid-based photographer Esther Lobo created a series of fantastic Rorschach inkblot tests made with yogurt, ice cream, peanut butter, condiments, and other types of food:

"The stains were made completely manually with my own hands and without post-processing tricks. I used soft plastic plates (Foamy). Then I dropped foods such as mustard, squid ink or soya over the plates. After bending the plates I obtained the symmetric stains. Finally I have placed the source of the stain over the symmetrical image, and so documented the psychological portrait of each food stuff."

What first comes to mind when you look at each image is supposed to say something about your personality. But in this case, it might just be hunger.
source
odditiesoflife:

Food Rorschach Tests
Quick, what comes to mind when you see these Rorschach tests made with food? Madrid-based photographer Esther Lobo created a series of fantastic Rorschach inkblot tests made with yogurt, ice cream, peanut butter, condiments, and other types of food:

"The stains were made completely manually with my own hands and without post-processing tricks. I used soft plastic plates (Foamy). Then I dropped foods such as mustard, squid ink or soya over the plates. After bending the plates I obtained the symmetric stains. Finally I have placed the source of the stain over the symmetrical image, and so documented the psychological portrait of each food stuff."

What first comes to mind when you look at each image is supposed to say something about your personality. But in this case, it might just be hunger.
source
odditiesoflife:

Food Rorschach Tests
Quick, what comes to mind when you see these Rorschach tests made with food? Madrid-based photographer Esther Lobo created a series of fantastic Rorschach inkblot tests made with yogurt, ice cream, peanut butter, condiments, and other types of food:

"The stains were made completely manually with my own hands and without post-processing tricks. I used soft plastic plates (Foamy). Then I dropped foods such as mustard, squid ink or soya over the plates. After bending the plates I obtained the symmetric stains. Finally I have placed the source of the stain over the symmetrical image, and so documented the psychological portrait of each food stuff."

What first comes to mind when you look at each image is supposed to say something about your personality. But in this case, it might just be hunger.
source
odditiesoflife:

Food Rorschach Tests
Quick, what comes to mind when you see these Rorschach tests made with food? Madrid-based photographer Esther Lobo created a series of fantastic Rorschach inkblot tests made with yogurt, ice cream, peanut butter, condiments, and other types of food:

"The stains were made completely manually with my own hands and without post-processing tricks. I used soft plastic plates (Foamy). Then I dropped foods such as mustard, squid ink or soya over the plates. After bending the plates I obtained the symmetric stains. Finally I have placed the source of the stain over the symmetrical image, and so documented the psychological portrait of each food stuff."

What first comes to mind when you look at each image is supposed to say something about your personality. But in this case, it might just be hunger.
source
odditiesoflife:

Food Rorschach Tests
Quick, what comes to mind when you see these Rorschach tests made with food? Madrid-based photographer Esther Lobo created a series of fantastic Rorschach inkblot tests made with yogurt, ice cream, peanut butter, condiments, and other types of food:

"The stains were made completely manually with my own hands and without post-processing tricks. I used soft plastic plates (Foamy). Then I dropped foods such as mustard, squid ink or soya over the plates. After bending the plates I obtained the symmetric stains. Finally I have placed the source of the stain over the symmetrical image, and so documented the psychological portrait of each food stuff."

What first comes to mind when you look at each image is supposed to say something about your personality. But in this case, it might just be hunger.
source
odditiesoflife:

Food Rorschach Tests
Quick, what comes to mind when you see these Rorschach tests made with food? Madrid-based photographer Esther Lobo created a series of fantastic Rorschach inkblot tests made with yogurt, ice cream, peanut butter, condiments, and other types of food:

"The stains were made completely manually with my own hands and without post-processing tricks. I used soft plastic plates (Foamy). Then I dropped foods such as mustard, squid ink or soya over the plates. After bending the plates I obtained the symmetric stains. Finally I have placed the source of the stain over the symmetrical image, and so documented the psychological portrait of each food stuff."

What first comes to mind when you look at each image is supposed to say something about your personality. But in this case, it might just be hunger.
source

odditiesoflife:

Food Rorschach Tests

Quick, what comes to mind when you see these Rorschach tests made with food? Madrid-based photographer Esther Lobo created a series of fantastic Rorschach inkblot tests made with yogurt, ice cream, peanut butter, condiments, and other types of food:

"The stains were made completely manually with my own hands and without post-processing tricks. I used soft plastic plates (Foamy). Then I dropped foods such as mustard, squid ink or soya over the plates. After bending the plates I obtained the symmetric stains. Finally I have placed the source of the stain over the symmetrical image, and so documented the psychological portrait of each food stuff."

What first comes to mind when you look at each image is supposed to say something about your personality. But in this case, it might just be hunger.

source

(via odditiesoflife)

“A work of art is something produced by a person, but is not that person — it is of her, but is not her. It’s a reach, really — the artist is trying to inhabit, temporarily, a more compact, distilled, efficient, wittier, more true-seeing, precise version of herself — one that she can’t replicate in so-called ‘real’ life, no matter how hard she tries. That’s why she writes: to try and briefly be more than she truly is.”

George Saunders

[via NYT]

(via theatlantic)

(via theatlantic)

“hope is the thing with feathers”
— emily dickinson

explore-blog:

“It’s amazing to witness how attitudes on gay rights have evolved in my lifetime,” said Jack Hunter, the artist behind next week’s cover, “Moment of Joy.” Hunter, who originally submitted his image, unsolicited, to a Tumblr, continued, “This is great for our kids, a moment we can all celebrate.”

Best New Yorker cover since Chris Ware’s heartwarming Mother’s Day one and this brilliant Sendak-inspired idea.

It was actually Studio 360’s Kurt Andersen who first outed Bert and Ernie 33 years ago in his 1980 book, The Real Thing:

Bert and Ernie conduct themselves in the same loving, discreet way that millions of gay men, women and hand puppets do. They do their jobs well and live a splendidly settled life together in an impeccably decorated cabinet.

(via explore-blog)

Perfect for this rainy Thursday - The National: Tiny Desk Concert

"…there are clearly no patrons this time to finance him; he is working hard to prove something to himself and his new employer, not to impress rich backers…"
Eight of Pentacles, symbol of our current job market
 

"…there are clearly no patrons this time to finance him; he is working hard to prove something to himself and his new employer, not to impress rich backers…"

Eight of Pentacles, symbol of our current job market

 

“The life of sensation is the life of greed; it requires more and more. The life of the spirit requires less and less.”
— Annie Dillard (via Brain Pickings)
!!!

"Gli" 

When the eye scans a certain barrier, the imagination tends to go beyond that barrier. Walls reveal more things than they hide.

El Anatsui @ Brooklyn Museum

“Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences. (Roy Ascott’s phrase.) That solves a lot of problems: we don’t have to argue whether photographs are art, or whether performances are art, or whether Carl Andre’s bricks or Andrew Serranos’s piss or Little Richard’s ‘Long Tall Sally’ are art, because we say, ‘Art is something that happens, a process, not a quality, and all sorts of things can make it happen.’ … [W]hat makes a work of art ‘good’ for you is not something that is already ‘inside’ it, but something that happens inside you — so the value of the work lies in the degree to which it can help you have the kind of experience that you call art.”

Brian Eno (via jessiethatcher)

I could reblog/post this every day as a constant reminder.

(via notational)

And I’m sticking it up here for people who define the “good” in Make good art in ways that I definitely didn’t intend…

(via neil-gaiman)

(via neil-gaiman)